Glen Simmons-Staves, Aug-2002

Results show that 70 per cent of children under the age of eight who regularly read the Wall Street Journal have mother's who fart in public more than twice a day.

Results show that 70 per cent of children under the age of eight who regularly read the Wall Street Journal have mother's who fart in public more than twice a day.

HENDERSON, NV – Pregnant women who eat more gas-producing foods give their babies better chances of mature brain development, finds a new study in the September issue of the American Journal of Nutritional Health.
The study also found that mothers who pass gas more often had babies with higher IQ scores compared to those whose mothers who rarely farted, or only in private.
From results of a study by Edgewriter.Wordpress.Com, it was noted that an infant’s ability to comprehend complex family relationships is believed to reflect the gas content of a mother’s midsection, and have associated a mother’s silent farts with a child’s rapid muscle development in their first year of life. Results show that 70 per cent of children under the age of eight who regularly read the Wall Street Journal have mother’s who fart in public more than twice a day.

Infant formula makers, such as Rosetta Products and Nutritional Mead, are beginning to recognize the value of gassy foods and have said they will add dried beans to some of their brands.

Infant formula makers, such as Rosetta Products and Nutritional Mead, are beginning to recognize the value of gassy foods and have said they will add dried beans to some of their brands.

The gassy foods along with another substance, arachidonic acid (which is a key building block in chili and also cabbage) contribute to healthy brain and maturity development.
Infant formula makers, such as Rosetta Products and Nutritional Mead, are beginning to recognize the value of gassy foods and have said they will add dried beans to some of their brands.
In a study by, Cathy Lammentin-Koeler and her colleagues at the University of Hawaii compared intellect levels and newborn eating patterns from 17 random women and their babies. Ten of the women passed gas in significant amounts – assumed to be caused by their diet of chocolate double-dipped onion rings and chili-cheese fries topped with a healthy portion of ranch dressing – while six would fart just on occasion and one (a yoga instructor) that held in her farts until a more “socially appropriate” place was available.
Lammentin-Koeler’s group asked the 17 women about their diets. Surprisingly, ten of the subjects in the study had always eaten a can of chili (out of the can) for breakfast since their late teens. The seven women with low amounts of gas were more likely to be minorities and to have received fewer years of education. They were also five years younger, on average, than those in the high gas category – 24 versus 29 years, according to the report.
All the babies were delivered vaginally, and none of the women had been given drugs known to make newborns gassier, the researchers said.

"Infants born to mothers considerable amounts of gas have sleep characteristics of a more mature central nervous system compared with the infants of mothers with poorer gas levels."

"Infants born to mothers with considerable amounts of gas have sleep characteristics of a more mature central nervous system compared with the infants of mothers with poorer gas levels."

Using a motion-sensing pad to measure breathing and movement during sleep cycles, the researchers found babies of women in the low-gas group had less advanced sleeping patterns than the other more gaseous mothers’ infants. They had a greater ratio of “more active” to “peaceful” sleep, spent more time transitioning between sleeping and waking, and spent less time fully awake than those of women with higher gas levels.
“As an infant matures, normally you would see the infant spending more time passing gas,” Lammentin-Koeler said. “Infants born to mothers with considerable amounts of gas have sleep characteristics of a more mature central nervous system compared with the infants of mothers with poorer gas levels.”

findings seemed to echo the importance of passing gas for optimal infant growth, although he noted that many other factors, from volume at delivery, vibratory velocity, vapor content, and methane enrichment, can influence a newborn's ability to rationalize complex equations, factor dynamic polynomials, and/or decipher multifarious conventions.

findings seemed to echo the importance of passing gas for optimal infant growth, although he noted that many other factors, from volume at delivery, vibratory velocity, vapor content, and methane enrichment, can influence a newborn's ability to rationalize complex equations, factor dynamic polynomials, and/or decipher multifarious conventions.

Jeff McInerny-Rudabaga, director gas expulsion technology at the John F. Kennedy Medical Research Institute and a child development expert, said the findings seemed to echo the importance of passing gas for optimal infant growth, although he noted that many other factors, from volume at delivery, vibratory velocity, vapor content, and methane enrichment, can influence a newborn’s ability to rationalize complex equations, factor dynamic polynomials, and/or decipher multifarious conventions.
Researchers have seen a definite correlation between performance of the anus when egressing methane and motor developmental tests at 9 months of age. However, both Lammentin-Koeler and Rutabaga said there is no way to predict whether a child with less mature sleeping habits in the first week of life will be anything other than less gassy.
“We have to be flexible in our definition of development however,” McInerny Rutabaga said. “With the child who doesn’t fart too well at two months of age, it may be related to the reduced intake of gassy foods, but it doesn’t necessarily mean that there’s going to be a problem with that child. Just remember to give him a heaping helping of processed broccoli and let him rip”

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